Wednesday, November 20, 2019

It's Turkey Time! The Thanksgiving Episode of Dad Time Out Show

Greetings...I'm back!

What else is back? Dad Time Out Show!

This is our Thanksgiving Episode! Have a listen - be a fan...you know you want to...

I hope you enjoy this one...we had a great time recording it!

Mark Harvey

Thursday, October 31, 2019

October 31st, 2019...It's HALLOWEEN!

Well folks...we made it!  Another FULL month of blogging and blog posts and tonight I'll be taking my kids out for trick or treating, seeing the sights, eating some candy and having fun.

If you're not already aware of it, you can surf over to 13thTrack.com Halloween Radio and stream Halloween music for your party, for trick or treaters, to play in the dark or just to vibe out to.  Surf on over!

There are a few songs that resonate with me on Halloween night specifically.

First up is "Candy" from Rain Station's "DARK RIDE" CD. Jay created a fantastic video for this track - here - and I just LOVE this tune.  Have a listen...
Next up is another track from "DARK RIDE" that is perfect for Halloween night.  Jay created a video for this track as well - here.  Have a listen to "Trick or Treatin'"...
Last up tonight is a FREE download of "It's Halloween" which is an unreleased song from Rain Station.  Jay made a video for "It's Halloween" and you can watch it here.  Have a listen to the song before you download it.
Download "It's Halloween" here.

OK, enough treats for now - go out and have a safe Halloween!

Mark Harvey



October 31st, 2019...drinkin' a little with your candy?

Happy Halloween everyone!

I'm just going to leave this right here...

I plan to have a few drinks tonight, but not sure I'll be pairing candy and beer. I guess we'll see.

What's your favorite "pairing"?

Do tell!








Happy Halloween!

Mark Harvey

Wednesday, October 30, 2019

October 30th, 2019...

Greetings guys and ghouls,

Fifteen years ago today I married my wife.  We both would have preferred to pick a different day for our wedding anniversary since there's always so much to do to get ready for Halloween (if you're like me) and our anniversary doesn't get the attention it deserves.

This year is not unique for many reasons.  Lots going on in, but all is good.  We will find a way to get away to celebrate our 15 years of married life together.

I love you honey, Happy Anniversary.


So since we're talking October brides...have a listen to "October's Bride" off  Rain Station's DARK RIDE CD.


If you've not taken the time to check out the DARK RIDE videos, please do. Visit JackoLantern.org or click the links below....
HAUNTED MAN
MONSTER HUNTER
DARK RIDE
and the BONUS track "IT'S HALLOWEEN"



Happy Anniversary to my lovely wife and Happy 30th of October. TOMORROW is THE day! HALLOWEEN PEOPLE!!!!

Mark Harvey







Tuesday, October 29, 2019

October 29th, 2019...cookies....

Greetings and salutations,

This year I've done pretty well avoiding all the Halloween shopping I'd usually do, but last night I couldn't resist these.

The kids, my wife and I really enjoyed them.

Maybe it's me, but it seems like there are less and less Halloween themed foods in the stores this season. So maybe my avoidance has had more to do with the lack of items versus my desire to not shop.
Pondering...

Anyhow, we are closing in...

Halloween Approaches!







Happy Haunting,

Mark Harvey

October 29th, 2019...

Hey gang! I thought I'd post a bunch of my favorite YouTube videos for you watching enjoyment!
I hope they bring you as much joy as they do me!










HAPPY HAUNTING!

Mark Harvey

Monday, October 28, 2019

October 28th, 2019...

Greetings and salutations friends and fiends,

Here's another Dad Time Out Show podcast for you...Halloween edition!

This is a fun show for everyone. Have a listen...drop a line...tell your friends...

"In the Halloween Episode the guys break down all things candy, costumes and creepy. They call Ben's mom and also talk about self care, their love of the Calm app and finish off with a sweet candy quiz. Dad Jokes, Tweets of the week and more... Happy Halloween!"



 
Happy Haunting,

Mark Harvey

Sunday, October 27, 2019

October 27th, 2019...

Halloween's origins date back to the ancient Celtic festival of Samhain (pronounced sow-in). The Celts, who lived 2,000 years ago in the area that is now Ireland, the United Kingdom, and northern France, celebrated their new year on November 1. This day marked the end of the summer, the harvest, and the beginning of the dark, cold winter, a time of year that was often associated with human death. Celts believed that on the night before the new year, the boundary between the worlds of the living and the dead became blurred. On the night of October 31, they celebrated Samhain, when it was believed that the ghosts of the dead returned to earth. In addition to causing trouble and damaging crops, Celts thought that the presence of the otherworldly spirits made it easier for the Druids, or Celtic priests, to make predictions about the future. For a people entirely dependent on the volatile natural world, these prophecies were an important source of comfort and direction during the long, dark winter.

To commemorate the event, Druids built huge sacred bonfires, where the people gathered to burn crops and animals as sacrifices to the Celtic deities. During the celebration, the Celts wore costumes, typically consisting of animal heads and skins, and attempted to tell each other's fortunes. When the celebration was over, they re-lit their hearth fires, which they had extinguished earlier that evening, from the sacred bonfire to help protect them during the coming winter.

By A.D. 43, Romans had conquered the majority of Celtic territory. In the course of the four hundred years that they ruled the Celtic lands, two festivals of Roman origin were combined with the traditional Celtic celebration of Samhain. The first was Feralia, a day in late October when the Romans traditionally commemorated the passing of the dead. The second was a day to honor Pomona, the Roman goddess of fruit and trees. The symbol of Pomona is the apple and the incorporation of this celebration into Samhain probably explains the tradition of "bobbing" for apples that is practiced today on Halloween.

By the 800s, the influence of Christianity had spread into Celtic lands. In the seventh century, Pope Boniface IV designated November 1 All Saints' Day, a time to honor saints and martyrs. It is widely believed today that the pope was attempting to replace the Celtic festival of the dead with a related, but church-sanctioned holiday. The celebration was also called All-hallows or All-hallowmas (from Middle English Alholowmesse meaning All Saints' Day) and the night before it, the night of Samhain, began to be called All-hallows Eve and, eventually, Halloween. Even later, in A.D. 1000, the church would make November 2 All Souls' Day, a day to honor the dead. It was celebrated similarly to Samhain, with big bonfires, parades, and dressing up in costumes as saints, angels, and devils. Together, the three celebrations, the eve of All Saints', All Saints', and All Souls', were called Hallowmas.

As European immigrants came to America, they brought their varied Halloween customs with them. Because of the rigid Protestant belief systems that characterized early New England, celebration of Halloween in colonial times was extremely limited there. It was much more common in Maryland and the southern colonies. As the beliefs and customs of different European ethnic groups, as well as the American Indians, meshed, a distinctly American version of Halloween began to emerge. The first celebrations included "play parties," public events held to celebrate the harvest, where neighbors would share stories of the dead, tell each other's fortunes, dance, and sing. Colonial Halloween festivities also featured the telling of ghost stories and mischief-making of all kinds. By the middle of the nineteenth century, annual autumn festivities were common, but Halloween was not yet celebrated everywhere in the country.

In the second half of the nineteenth century, America was flooded with new immigrants. These new immigrants, especially the millions of Irish fleeing Ireland's potato famine of 1846, helped to popularize the celebration of Halloween nationally. Taking from Irish and English traditions, Americans began to dress up in costumes and go house to house asking for food or money, a practice that eventually became today's "trick-or-treat" tradition. Young women believed that, on Halloween, they could divine the name or appearance of their future husband by doing tricks with yarn, apple parings, or mirrors.

In the late 1800s, there was a move in America to mold Halloween into a holiday more about community and neighborly get-togethers, than about ghosts, pranks, and witchcraft. At the turn of the century, Halloween parties for both children and adults became the most common way to celebrate the day. Parties focused on games, foods of the season, and festive costumes. Parents were encouraged by newspapers and community leaders to take anything "frightening" or "grotesque" out of Halloween celebrations. Because of their efforts, Halloween lost most of its superstitious and religious overtones by the beginning of the twentieth century.

By the 1920s and 1930s, Halloween had become a secular, but community-centered holiday, with parades and town-wide parties as the featured entertainment. Despite the best efforts of many schools and communities, vandalism began to plague Halloween celebrations in many communities during this time. By the 1950s, town leaders had successfully limited vandalism and Halloween had evolved into a holiday directed mainly at the young. Due to the high numbers of young children during the fifties baby boom, parties moved from town civic centers into the classroom or home, where they could be more easily accommodated. Between 1920 and 1950, the centuries-old practice of trick-or-treating was also revived. Trick-or-treating was a relatively inexpensive way for an entire community to share the Halloween celebration. In theory, families could also prevent tricks being played on them by providing the neighborhood children with small treats. A new American tradition was born, and it has continued to grow. Today, Americans spend over $2.5 billion annually on Halloween, making it the Country's second largest commercial holiday.

Information courtesy of the History Channel.
Visit www.historychannel.com

Happy Haunting,

Mark Harvey

Saturday, October 26, 2019

October 26th, 2019...Richard McGhee - "WITCHCRAFT (Free MP3)

Around this time of year I get really lonely for Richard McGhee. Here is a FREE MP3 download of Witchcraft (click here) by Richard McGhee *Star Vocalist* recorded at the Rain Station's Halloween Bash that we had many years ago. This tune features Richard McGhee *Star Vocalist* (click here to check him out LIVE). The track taken from a live recording (off the board) at a Halloween party at the Rain Station. We hired Richard McGhee *Star Vocalist* to be the entertainment at our party and I got a first class recording of his show.

Such a perfect time of year to celebrate Richard's life (see what I wrote about him in a previous post by clicking here). Such a perfect song for the Halloween season. His spirit lives on in my memory and his determination to be THE *Star Vocalist* that he was inspires me everyday to live my life to the fullest.
Your comments are appreciated.

Enjoy!

Mark Harvey

Click here if you can't figure out where you're supposed to click to download the song.



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Thank you for visiting - Mark Harvey